"I felt as though I didn't have any rights."

About: Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Hospital

(as the patient),

I was saved from certain death, but taken to a personal hell by not being allowed to drive. I was shocked to live through an experience of being dictated to by insurance company rules instead of reality i.e, forced to lie in a urine soaked bed because I was classed as a trip and fall hazard, even though the toilet was 3 feet away and I didn't fall once. The warnings and "what if's became overwhelming as a hospital has to be an oppressive environment for the functioning of such a large organisation. That feeling of oppression should not filter down to the patient, (me).

I understand there are rules, however the simple human rights issues like being allowed to use a toilet when needed are bypassed under the auspice of health and safety. From my perspective, I left the hospital eventually after begging to get out under my own steam, i.e. after being discharged, I walked out unaided. I did take weeks to gain true perspective of the outside world again, which was up to me, as all the indoctrination pumped in to me from staff left me very unsure of myself. However, the simple explanation that after a stroke my perspectives will have changed didn't come, instead all and every deficit that could be found in me was pointed out in every opportunity the therapists found, and no solutions offered to remedy the deficits.

How did I feel?  Having heard all the 'what if stories, I felt like I was not hospitalised but imprisoned to the stage that I vow not to return to hospital should I suffer another stroke, which is still a decision that I'm allowed to make as a human. I believe this is a direct result of the punitive rules imposed upon patients in the hospital. Trying very hard to find a positive with all this, it has reignited my desire to improve and succeed (through initial frustration which led to internal anger) even if at times I've had to endure the lowest of low emotions

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